5 Easy Sweet Potato Juicing Recipes

The humble sweet potato – who would have thought that juicing these somewhat ugly, gnarled tubers could bring so much flavor and nutrition to your diet?

We are used to seeing sweet potatoes in soups, or baked, made into fries or mashed as part of a savory meal, but they are absolutely amazing when incorporated into a juice recipe thanks to their versatility.

Combined with other vegetables and/or fruit, they can provide a multitude of health benefits as well as tasting quite delicious – they may, however, be an acquired taste for those who prefer more sweetness in their juices.

The humble sweet potato – who would have thought that juicing these somewhat ugly, gnarled tubers could bring so much flavor and nutrition to your diet?

We are used to seeing sweet potatoes in soups, or baked, made into fries or mashed as part of a savory meal, but they are absolutely amazing when incorporated into a juice recipe thanks to their versatility. Combined with other vegetables and/or fruit, they can provide a multitude of health benefits as well as tasting quite delicious – they may, however, be an acquired taste for those who prefer more sweetness in their juices.

Sweet potatoes, or yams, were originally credited to the more ‘tropical’ regions of South America and the continent of Africa, but are now grown worldwide.

Why Are Sweet Potatoes So Healthy?

holding basket of sweet potatoes

It’s a good question, considering they are high in carbohydrates. However, they do contain some rich sources of nutrients, particularly those with the orangey-colored flesh, as this demonstrates the beta-carotene content.

The human body converts beta-carotene into vitamin A (retinol), which promotes healthy skin and mucus membranes, provides additional aid to the immune system, and assists in keeping your eyes and vision healthy.

This is not an essential nutrient, but its conversion to Vitamin A does indeed provide enormous health-giving properties.

More good news comes for diabetics, many of whom crave ordinary potatoes but are conscious of the fact that they can only be consumed in moderation due to their condition.

Sweet potatoes have a sweet taste on the palate but the natural sugars contained within are ‘slow release’ (important for diabetics) so they are gradually unleashed as a regular and balanced source of energy, thus preventing spikes which ultimately can cause unnecessary weight gain or tiredness and fatigue.

Health Benefits of Sweet Potatoes

There are a multitude of other benefits to be gained from consuming sweet potatoes, including:

  • Increased vitamin intake (particularly Vitamin E) which assists in lowering the risk of cardiovascular problems
  • Vitamin E can also benefit asthma sufferers
  • Sweet potatoes contain quercetin – a phytochemical that is scientifically proven to assist in the fight against cancer. A 2011 issue of ‘Cancer Science’ magazine shows an article relating to the stemming of tumors, particularly in the case of skin cancer
  • Potentially useful for improved memory and cognitive function with the theory that it may aid in treating Alzheimer’s Disease.
  • Good source of potassium and magnesium – the former helps healthy kidney function, and the latter is beneficial to the heart, blood, muscle and nerve function. There is increased evidence in the United States that these two minerals are often lacking in the population. Magnesium is also important in the reduction of stress, a frequent occurrence in today’s world.
  • Vitamin D (also a hormone) should be naturally present in our bodies, as long as we obtain adequate sunlight. If not, sweet potatoes can assist in providing this vitamin and preventing depression and seasonal disorders such as SAD.
  • Immune function – sweet potatoes contain iron, which assists in increasing the strength of our immune systems and is essential in the production of both white and red blood cells.

Who would have thought that such a vegetable would be packed with so many good nutrients, underneath that under-imposing skin!

Juicing Sweet Potatoes

Novices may shudder at the thought of juicing a sweet potato – it’s quite hard and almost unimaginable – but it is no different to juicing food such as carrots. In fact, the vegetables have the same kind of texture if you think about it.

Treat it the same – peel, wash and cut into chunks or pieces, depending on your juicer manufacturer’s instructions. When juicing a sweet potato, the end liquid will always appear a little ‘frothy’, but this is normal.

The juice has a mild flavor and slightly creamy texture, but there is no doubt that it benefits from the addition of other fruits and vegetables. 

Apples go particularly well with sweet potatoes, as do some kind of herb or spice (try ginger – it never fails). Oranges are another good addition to a sweet potato juice, that hint of citrus brings the creamy flavor alive and more vibrant.

When juicing sweet potatoes, it is a good idea to pick up some other fruit and vegetables at the market and experiment. When you think of other fruits in a juice, you can imagine the taste, but that’s a lot more difficult with a sweet potato!

Experimentation is highly recommended until you get the right blend that makes you want to drink up and have some more.

Just a word of warning – don’t overdose on this juice as you could suffer weight gain.

5 Simple Juicing Recipes Using Sweet Potatoes

Here are 5 good combinations for you to try – adjust the quantities against each other until you find the one that is right for you – this is just a guideline of ingredients that match well with each other.

  • RECIPE #1: 1 sweet potato, 1 x 1-inch piece of fresh ginger, 1 x 1-inch piece of fresh turmeric, 1 apple, 2 stalks of celery and 2 teaspoons powdered cinnamon (this mix gives a delicious warmth to the recipe, really good in the colder months)

  • RECIPE #2: 2 sweet potatoes, 1 carrot, 1 or 2 large oranges and the juice of a lime (roughly 1 tbsp)

  • RECIPE #3: 2 sweet potatoes, 2 pears and 1 tsp of ground cinnamon (you can also add a little unsweetened apple or orange juice for a more fruity flavor)

  • RECIPE #4: 1 sweet potato, 2 carrots, 1 red pepper, 2 sticks of celery and 1x 1-inch piece fresh ginger

  • RECIPE #5: 1 sweet potato, 2 apples, 1 orange, 1 carrot, 4 stalks of celery and a 1-inch piece of fresh turmeric – for more spice, add a little ground nutmeg

Enjoy these unusual juices, and get used to making sweet potatoes part of your diet.